fuckyeahblackwidow:

Preview: Black Widow #11, on sale 10/1/14.
Awwww!

Awwww!

markruffalo:

femmercutio:

girls don’t like boys, girls like halloween and mark ruffalo’s tumblr account

I like Halloween and Tumblr, too.

firstbook:

What is it about banned books that make us want to read them even more?
Here’s a list of titles for young readers that have been challenged or banned.
The Giver By Lois Lowry. “Violence” and claims that the book is too dark for children are two reasons this title about a young man’s coming-of-age in a dystopian future has been challenged.
Charlotte’s WebBy E.B. White. As recently as 2006, <SPOiLER ALERT> passages about the spider dying were criticized as being “inappropriate subject matter for a children’s book.”
The Wizard of OzBy L. Frank Baum. This classic title was banned from libraries in Detroit for having “no value” for children and supporting “negativism.”
Charlie & the Chocolate FactoryBy Roald Dahl. In the early 1970s, this delicious classic was labeled as “tasteless.”
Bridge to TerabithiaBy Katherine Paterson. This title was challenged because of claims that it promoted witchcraft and violence.
Where the Wild Things AreBy Maurice Sendak. Some parents claimed this title was too dark and disturbing for young children, and would cause nightmares.
Harriet the SpyBy Louise Fitzhugh. Precocious Harriet was kept out of some schools and libraries “because it was said to set a bad example for children”.
The LoraxBy Dr. Seuss. This beloved children’s book was challenged in California because it was argued it would persuade children against the logging industry.
Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time IndianBy Sherman Alexie. This title about a14-year-old American Indian who leaves his school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white high school was pulled from school curricula because it uses graphic language and describes sexual acts.
« HAPPY BANNED BOOK WEEK! »

firstbook:

What is it about banned books that make us want to read them even more?

Here’s a list of titles for young readers that have been challenged or banned.

The Giver
By Lois Lowry. “Violence” and claims that the book is too dark for children are two reasons this title about a young man’s coming-of-age in a dystopian future has been challenged.

Charlotte’s Web
By E.B. White. As recently as 2006, <SPOiLER ALERT> passages about the spider dying were criticized as being “inappropriate subject matter for a children’s book.”

The Wizard of Oz
By L. Frank Baum. This classic title was banned from libraries in Detroit for having “no value” for children and supporting “negativism.”

Charlie & the Chocolate Factory
By Roald Dahl. In the early 1970s, this delicious classic was labeled as “tasteless.”

Bridge to Terabithia
By Katherine Paterson. This title was challenged because of claims that it promoted witchcraft and violence.

Where the Wild Things Are
By Maurice Sendak. Some parents claimed this title was too dark and disturbing for young children, and would cause nightmares.

Harriet the Spy
By Louise Fitzhugh. Precocious Harriet was kept out of some schools and libraries “because it was said to set a bad example for children”.

The Lorax
By Dr. Seuss. This beloved children’s book was challenged in California because it was argued it would persuade children against the logging industry.

Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
By Sherman Alexie. This title about a14-year-old American Indian who leaves his school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white high school was pulled from school curricula because it uses graphic language and describes sexual acts.

« HAPPY BANNED BOOK WEEK! »

This Season on Agents of SHIELD

professorthorgi:

Well, I saw THAT coming a mile off. Heh.

sixwordmemoirs:

Your Comic Book in Six Words? Contest ends today at 3!

But of course!

sixwordmemoirs:

Your Comic Book in Six Words? Contest ends today at 3!

But of course!

earthcrystal:

Russian Lemurian Ice Opal (Angel) Aura Quartz


I have never seen an ice opal&#8230; Wow.

earthcrystal:

  • Russian Lemurian Ice Opal (Angel) Aura Quartz

I have never seen an ice opal… Wow.

crownedrose:


(by Wes’s Way)

A stunning ammonite that has been replaced with opal and pyrite.

crownedrose:

(by Wes’s Way)

A stunning ammonite that has been replaced with opal and pyrite.

sensation comics #3 wonder woman really is the best super hero

Absolutely awesome, says the mom whose son says his favorite color is pink.

sixwordmemoirs:

Congrats to the winner of our "Write a Comic Book in Six Words" contest, Ms.Nan!

sixwordmemoirs:

Congrats to the winner of our "Write a Comic Book in Six Words" contest, Ms.Nan!

malformalady:

Boulder opal

malformalady:

Boulder opal

magic-in-the-average:

This is so beautiful

A wonderful series, which I am cursing right now because I CANNOT LEGALLY BUY THE LAST BOOK HERE IN AMERICA.  Seriously, in a world of global media, where fandoms transcend physical boundaries, where is the justice in that?!?But anyway, I like hugs.

magic-in-the-average:

This is so beautiful

A wonderful series, which I am cursing right now because I CANNOT LEGALLY BUY THE LAST BOOK HERE IN AMERICA. Seriously, in a world of global media, where fandoms transcend physical boundaries, where is the justice in that?!?

But anyway, I like hugs.

Different Types of Opals

captainfluffatun:

sixpenceee:

Andamooka Rough Opal

image

Black Opal

image

Boulder Opal

image

Fossilized Opal

image

Ocean Opal

image

Raw Fire Opal

image

Tree Fossil with Opal Rings

image

SOURCE & MORE IMAGES

THE LAST ONE

I am a dragon at heart when it comes to opals. I’d have a hoard of them, if only I could afford it!

amnhnyc:

More than 20,000 species of plants and animals around the world are currently under threat of extinction, and hundreds vanish each year. We don’t always know the exact time of extinction, but for the Pinta Island giant tortoise, the date was June 24, 2012.

On that day, Lonesome George—the Galapagos Island tortoise now on display at the American Museum of Natural History, and the last known member of his species—died of natural causes. With him, his species, Chelonoidis abingdoni, vanished.

Over the last two years, Wildlife Preservations taxidermy experts have worked closely with Museum scientists to preserve Lonesome George as he appeared in life—down to a missing toenail on his left front foot.

Watch a video about the preservation process, and learn much more about Lonesome George

Yes.  Yes yes yes.

Yes. Yes yes yes.